Category Archives: Miscellaneous

Prosciutto

Prosciutto San Daniele DOP

By Toni Brancatisano

. . . “Prosciutto Crudo is an Italian dry-cured ham that is usually served raw and thinly sliced. The word crudo means raw, as opposed to prosciutto cotto,  which is cooked.  It is characterised by a pinkish-red color and is slightly veined with thin streaks of fat. The fat or lard around it, which is pure white, is delicate and complements the meat so, when eating Prosciutto Crudo,  both the meat and the fat should be enjoyed together. . .”
Prosciutto

Read the complete article here.
Prosciutto

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Piemontese Palate

Piemontese Palate

Piemontese Palate

An interesting article from L’Italo-Americano –

The Piemontese Palate: Rich, Traditional, and Delicious

By Paula Reynolds

“There is one region, however, that is perchance lacking credit where credit is due…Piedmont/Piemonte. A northernmost province, Piedmont sits mirthfully tucked in the north-west cuff of the boot, sharing the largest portion of its border with France. The capital city of Turin is potentially the best-known in the region, her accolades to include Fiat and The Shroud. However, there are many gastronomic wonders to be found throughout the smorgasbord of culinary richness that is the Piemontese palate. . . “
Read the complete article here.

Piemontese Palate

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New York Restaurants and Covid 19

New York Restaurants and COVID 19

New York Restaurants and COVID 19New York Restaurants and COVID 19
We had dinner on Broadway. I mean really on Broadway, right in the street. The City has granted restaurant owners the right to set up tables in what used to be the parking lane in the street fronting their restaurants.

We ate at Telio, one of our favorite locals. They went a step further and had a singer at dinnertime. The whole scene was very festive.New York Restaurants and COVID 19

On some avenues, there’s a bike lane between the curb and the parking lane, so ‘Watch Out.’New York Restaurants and COVID 19New York Restaurants and COVID 19

Some of them have gotten very creative and set up platforms, colorful barriers and planters under canopies and umbrellas that look like a small  oasis.New York Restaurants and COVID 19New York Restaurants and COVID 19New York Restaurants and CORVID 19
I don’t suppose this will work well in winter, but for now it offers an opportunity to eat out without going into a restaurant.

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Garlic Scapes

Garlic Scapes

I’ve never heard of ‘garlic scapes’ and don’t know where to find them but here’s a recipe that I’d like to try.  An article in Italy Magazine explains it.

Zolle Sott’Olio | Pickled Garlic Scapes in Oil

by Domenica Marchetti

“Zolle sott’olio ~ pickled garlic scapes preserved in oil ~ are a specialty of Sulmona, a picturesque medieval city ringed by mountains in Abruzzo. The city is mostly famous for confetti, those candy-coated almond confections you see at Italian weddings, and for being the birthplace of the poet Ovid. . .”
See the whole article and recipe here. Garlic Scapes

 

Garlic Scapes

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Hot Chocolate and the Pirate

Hot Chocolate and the Pirate

From a article in Atlas Obscura –

A Pirate Botanist Helped Bring Hot Chocolate to England

William Hughes was a buccaneer with an early recipe for “the American Nectar.”

by Reina Gattuso


“. . . If you had met him the year his famous book was published, you might have mistaken William Hughes for a mild-mannered gardener. By that time, he had settled into his role at the country estate of the Viscountess Conway, a noblewoman and philosopher, and had published a book on grapevines. But the old man was more than a tottering plant enthusiast. When his treatise on New World botany, The American Physitian, dropped in 1672, its contents revealed a swashbuckling history. . .”
Hot Chocolate and the Pirate

Complete article here.Hot Chocolate and the Pirate

 

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Tough Time’s Dishes

Tough Time’s Dishes

Necessity is the mother of invention. When you can’t get the ingredients you need for a special dish you can improvise.

Tough Time’s Dishes

From an article in Gastro Obscura – Even More Historic Dishes Born from Tough Times to Make at Home
By Luke Fater

“While most sheltering-in-place restrictions remain in effect and frugality is paramount, here’s a new batch of dishes from bygone tough times like these. World War rationing and Great Depression resilience gave birth to unthinkable concoctions like an apple-less apple pie and a chocolate cake without butter, milk, or eggs . . . “

For the complete article on Tough Time’s Dishes click here

Tough Time’s Dishes

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Foraging in New York

Foraging in New York

There’s plenty to eat in New York City’s parks if you know where to look according to an article in Mold.
WHAT TO FORAGE IN NEW YORK CITY RIGHT NOW
by Ellie Plass
“New York looks very different than it did, even just a month ago. COVID-19 is at the forefront of everyone’s minds and concerns, and is changing the way we think about leaving our homes. Even so, the seasons keep coming, and Spring is upon us. Although, most of the time, we may be experiencing it from our open windows, the extra time you may have on your hands can be good for learning a new skill. The parks here are absolutely full of forageable greens and edible plants that can still be safely harvested while maintaining a safe distance from your neighbors. . . “Foraging in New York
See the compete article here. 

Foraging in New York

 

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COVID-19 Pasta Drama

COVID-19 Pasta Drama

Penne with lines to hold the sauce


From an article in MOLD. (Things like this mean so much to Italians. Try to understand. )
SMOOTH VS RIDGED PENNE, A COVID-19 PASTA DRAMA
by Elizabeth T. Jones
“. . . Less than 24 hours after Italy announced a COVID19 outbreak in Lombardia in Northern Italy, photos of barren Italian supermarket shelves were posted on Twitter. The subject of the social media buzz centered around one of Italy’s most favorite topics: pasta. Lonely bags of smooth penne pasta, penne lisce, remained perched on ravaged aisles. All of the penne rigate, ridged penne, was gone. . . “

COVID-19 Pasta Drama

An Italian Tweet – Continuo a guardare questa foto fatta prima al supermercato e penso al fatto che il grande sconfitto da questo virus sono le penne lisce che agli italiani fanno cagare pure quando sono presi dal panico e si preparano all’apocalisse.
Translation – “I keep looking at this photo I took earlier in the supermarket, and I think the biggest loser of this virus is penne lisce. Italians think it’s shit, even as they panic and prepare for the apocalypse.”
Read the complete article here

COVID-19 Pasta Drama

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Lemons and the Pandemic

How the Influenza Pandemic Popularized Lemons

I came across this pandemic related article in Gastro Obscura –

“In the fall of 1918, as influenza spread across the globe and the world clamored for a cure, the price of lemons skyrocketed. From Rome to Rio to Boston, residents desperate for any small measure of protection hoarded the yellow fruit, which was said—by whom it was, even then, unclear—to be both a prophylactic and a remedy for the deadly virus. Newspaper articles promised the citrus was a “flu foe,” and advised, “If you are not a flu victim deny yourself that glass of lemonade.” In New York, the Federal Food Board stepped in to prevent price gouging. . .”

Lemons and the Pandemic

For the full article click here.

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Mercato

Mercato

If you live in New York you’ve probably heard of Schaller and Webber. It’s an old-fashioned German butcher shop but really more than that. In addition to fresh cut meat they also have a variety of wursts and smoked meats, quite a few salads, and imported European groceries and beer.
It’s on the Upper East Side and we live on the Upper West Side, so it isn’t close. We still manage to shop there at least every 6 weeks. Since CORVID 19 we’ve been using a service called Mercato for some of our shopping. You order on their website and they arrange purchases at the best independently owned food stores in New York and delivery it to you within a day or so. So, here’s our most recent delivery that made a great dinner.Mercado

Mercado

MercadoMercado


Mercato’s website here


Schaller and Weber’s website here

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