Utensils – Part II

utensils

UTINSILS – Part II


Small Mandolin mandolinSlices garlic as thinly as Paul Scovino did in Good Fellas and it’s cheap enough to throw away when it gets dull.  Get one in a housewares store for $5 or $10. Watch your fingers, it’s sharp.


Hanging Basket hanging basket

Good for handy storage of root vegetables and perfect for drying peppers.


Mushroom Brush mushroom brush

For getting that ugly brown stuff off mushrooms.


Egg Beater egg beater

 Quicker than a whisk for fluffy omelets and zabaglione.


Fish Gripper & Scaler  fish griper & scaler

This gripper was my father’s and is over 50 years old – Delty’s Fish Gripper, Lancaster PA.


Masher masher

Use it to make a lumpy sauce smooth – squashes tomatoes, onions, etc. as they’re cooking.


Shrimp Deveiner

 shrimp deveiner

A great design by Lamson Sharp.


Pepper Roaster pepper roaster

Really a grater but it doubles as a grill for roasting peppers on a gas burner – about 2 or 3 jalapenos or 1 bell at a time.


Processor processor

This one only holds about 2 ½ cups. I use it for making a trinity or any other fine chopping.


Herb baggie

herb baggie

To keep parsley, rosemary, etc. fresh put them in water in a rocks glass, cover with a baggie and refrigerate.  Works with basil too but don’t refrigerate.  Rather than a bowl or tray, use baggies for marinating meat and fish


 

Pousse Caffe

pousse caffe

Pousse Caffe

Not too long ago my cousin Jeanne reminded me about a special after-dinner drink my father would make for our grandmother when we went to see her on holidays. It’s called a Pousse Caffe.That translates to something like ‘coffee chaser.’ It’s made by very carefully pouring layers of different colored liquors with different densities into a pony glass. They have to be poured in the correct order or they’ll mix. He held the glass on an angle so the liquor would slowly and gently run down its side. With some care and a steady hand, you can do it.

My father’s five layer recipe starts with a red base of Grenadine Syrup, followed by chocolaty Crème de Cacao, then green Crème de Menthe, clear Cointreau and topped with some amber Cognac. Use about one half ounce of each or vary the amounts for different of thicknesses of color layers. 

Pousse Caffe ingredients
Pousse Caffe ingredients

It should be drunk in one shot, the way my grandmother did it. You get a swirl of different tastes in your mouth. It’s more a confection than a drink – not too sweet or tart.


Italian Flag Pousse Caffe

Whenever I make Pousse Caffes, since they’re so colorful, all the kids around the table want one. So I’ve come up with a milder version.

Italin Flag Pousse Caffe

It starts with the same non-alcoholic Grenadine Syrup, then a thin layer of the green Crème de Menthe topped with some  half and half. The only alcohol is in the ¼ ounce of low proof Crème De Menthe.


Brandy Scaffa

Brandy Scaeffa

Another version of a layered after-dinner drink is the Brandy Scaffa. It’s not too sweet and has a bit more kick than the Pousse Caffe.

Luxardo

Start with 3/4 ounce of Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur in a narrow glass and then float 3/4 ounce of brandy on top of it. Finish with three dashes of Angostura Bitters sprinkled on top. Then watch it sink to make a reddish-brown line between the two layers. Of course, to get the correct effect, you should do it in one shot.


 

Utensils

utensils

UTENSILS


Wooden Spatula

wooden spatula

Use it for deglazing.  It’s gentler than a metal one for scraping up the brown bits.


Hachoir or Mezza Luna (?)

mezza luna

I found this chopper at a yard sale.  I’m still not too sure how it’s really supposed to be used but its old and interesting.  It came from a Philadelphia restaurant.


Mellon Baller

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Perfect for removing choke from artichokes. I suppose you can use it for balling melons too.


Cutlet Pounder

 cutlet pounder

When the butcher doesn’t make them thin enough, here you go.


Blender

Blender

Good for powdering spices or making Flips & Frulatto.  I got this one in a flea market. It’s nothing fancy with only two speeds, on and off.


Muddler

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 For Old Fashioneds, Mint Juleps Caipirinhas, etc.


Garlic Press

 garlic press 

Speaks for itself.


Potato Peeler

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Buy a cheap one and replace it when it gets dull.


coke logoOlive Pitter

 Coke bottle

The curved bottom is the perfect shape for squashing olives so you can remove the pit.


Citrus Juicer

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A simple design but does the job.


 

 

 

 

Chinatown – Flushing, New York

 

Hong Kong Market

Chinatown – Flushing, New York

New York City used to have one Chinatown and now there are three. In additional to the original in downtown Manhattan, there’s one in Sunset Park, Brooklyn and another in Flushing.  This morning we went shopping in Flushing.

Fresh produce, seafood, meat and all kinds of Asian imports beautifully displayed and good prices too.

And did I mention fresh fish…

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Asian – Italian Fusion – Spaghetti al Nero Sepia con Bok Choy

Boil washed and sliced bok choy until tender (This recipe works with broccoli rabe, arugula or other greens too. Made like this, weeds would taste good.) Sauté the still wet greens and with garlic and oil.  Add S&P, red pepper flakes cover and steam.  When it wilts, toss with pasta. Simple, right? A little cheese isn’t bad on this.

Pasta con Bok CHoy

 

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Adele Sarno

 

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Adele Sarno, 85, in her Manhattan apartment, where she has lived since the 1960s. Her landlord, the Italian American Museum, wants to evict her. Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times

Adele Sarno

In Japan, Adele Sarno would be considered a Living National Treasure but in New York she’s being evicted. An 85 years old Italian-American woman is in the way of the expansion plans of the Italian-American Museum. How’s that for irony?

Two quotes for yesterday’s New York Times that sum up the issue:  (the complete article is below)

 “You’re fighting a museum that purports to exhibit Italian-American culture and then proceeds to evict a living artifact,” said Victor J. Papa, director of the  Two Bridges Neighborhood Council.

 “So the museum should be running a charity or providing residences at discount rates?” Joe Carella, the spokesman, asked. “That doesn’t match the mission.”

 

New York Times – 3/25/15

Museum in Little Italy Seeks to Evict a Living Link to the Past

By MIREYA NAVARRO

Adele Sarno’s father, a longshoreman, emigrated from Naples, and she grew up in Manhattan’s Little Italy. As a child, she served as princess for the annual Feast of San Gennaro, she said, and one year was even crowned the queen.

Ms. Sarno eventually owned a candy shop and, later, an Italian products store below her family’s apartment on Grand Street until Sept. 11, when business dried up.

The number of people of Italian ancestry who live in Little Italy is shrinking by the year, and may soon drop by one more: Ms. Sarno, 85, is being evicted from her apartment after losing a fight to keep her $820-a-month rent from skyrocketing. But what has gotten tenant advocates’ attention is not just her age, but also the identity of the landlord: the Italian American Museum, which is in the building next door.

“You’re fighting a museum that purports to exhibit Italian-American culture and then proceeds to evict a living artifact,” said Victor J. Papa, director of the Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, an affordable housing group that has helped Ms. Sarno in her effort to stay. “That’s absolute hypocrisy.”

A spokesman for the museum said ethnicity had nothing to do with it. The museum owns a total of six apartments, including Ms. Sarno’s, in three contiguous tenement buildings at Mulberry and Grand Streets, and relies on the rental income to help pay expenses.

“So the museum should be running a charity or providing residences at discount rates?” Joe Carella, the spokesman, asked. “That doesn’t match the mission.”

Founded in 2001, the Italian American Museum is “dedicated to the struggles of Italian-Americans and their achievements and contributions to American culture and society,” according to the mission statement posted on its website. Ms. Sarno said she was indeed struggling, with a notice from the city marshal giving her only days to leave. She filed a request in housing court this week to halt the eviction.

“How could you throw old people out?” she said on Wednesday, sitting in her apartment, a mini-museum itself furnished with lamps, marble tables and ceramics from the old country. “I’m not going to be here that many more years. Let me die in my home.”

The players in the dispute have added a cultural element to one of the thousands of eviction cases in New York each year. In this case, Ms. Sarno’s two-bedroom unit could fetch five times the current rent in an area that, like many in the city, has become lucrative territory.

Ms. Sarno, whose only child, a daughter, lives in Wisconsin, wants to stay in the neighborhood where she was born by midwife. Her family, including two brothers, a sister and her parents, who eventually separated, all lived in Little Italy. She said she had moved to her current second-floor apartment, where her father was living, after her divorce in the 1960s.

Not much is left of Ms. Sarno’s Little Italy, now mostly a tourist magnet of a few blocks that has been overwhelmed by Chinatown’s sprawl. The 2010 census recorded not one neighborhood resident who had been born in Italy.

“My good friends all passed away,” she said. “I’ve got my television.”

She still counts on a few friends: the owner of the gun shop next door who takes out her garbage; the young couple upstairs who have a baby and pay $4,500 a month; an old boyfriend who drives her to a ShopRite on Staten Island to save on groceries.

Her doctors and the parish where she was baptized, Church of Most Precious Blood, founded in the late 1800s, remain within walking distance.

The museum moved to Little Italy from Midtown Manhattan in 2008, buying the three buildings for $9 million in order to expand. The recession halted those plans, Mr. Carella said, and the goal now is to find a developer to buy the buildings while allowing the museum to remain rent-free.

Ms. Sarno said she got a letter from the museum about five years ago saying that the rent was being raised to $3,500. With Social Security payments and help from relatives as her only sources of income, she said, she could not possibly pay that much.

With the help of Two Bridges Neighborhood Council, she sought a determination from state housing officials about whether her apartment was subject to rent-regulation laws that would protect her. She learned it was not, and after several years of appeals and legal back-and-forth, the museum was allowed to the pursue eviction in November. The notice to vacate followed this month.

Described by neighbors as an independent woman who goes to bed early, wakes up in the middle of the night and cooks pasta in the wee hours, Ms. Sarno said that if she was forced out, her most viable option would be to join her daughter in Wisconsin, taking along her 19-year-old cat, Tosha.

“I don’t want to go there,” she said. “I don’t drive. I’d be stuck in the house 24/7.”

In an interview, Joseph V. Scelsa, founder and director of the museum, rejected the idea that the eviction was at odds with the institution’s mission.

Little Italy, he said, “is not a community of Italian-Americans any longer.” He said at some point the population that gave the area its name would disappear entirely, but that “the legacy would still remain because we have an institution that does that.”

Other promoters of Italian-American culture saw the irony in the situation.

“I would hope they can find some sort of solution for her,” said Anthony Tamburri, dean of the John D. Calandra Italian American Institute at Queens College, where Dr. Scelsa once served as director. “The thought of an 85-year-old having to move to Wisconsin is unsettling to be sure.”

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Ms. Sarno was queen of the Feast of San Gennaro in 1945.

Link to New York Times article – click here

St. Joseph’s Day

Happy St. Joseph’s Day! March 19th is a big day for Italians celebrating their patron saint. It’s an even bigger celebration in Sicily where traditionally food was given to the poor. You don’t have to go to Sicily for the feast and you don’t have to be Sicilian (we’re Neopolitan). We went to Bar Eolo on 7th Ave. and 21st St. in Manhattan. They explain their name –

“According to Homer, Eolo—Italian for Greek mythology’s Aeolus, ruler of the wind— lived on the volcanic Aeolian islands off the north coast of Sicily and was a favorite among the Greek gods.”

Eolo
Eolo

The celebration was last Sunday and here’s what they served –

Eolo

The entertainment was great too, supplied by a Sicilian folk trio featuring Michela Musolino.

Eolo’s next event is an Easter Sunday lunch. 

Pasta con Sarde

St. Joseph is the patron saint of Sicily and March 19th is his feast day. This recipe is in honor of all my Sicilian friends who celebrate his day with this traditional dish. This is a basic recipe and I’m sure everybody’s grandmother makes it a little differently but if you’ve never made it before this is a good start.

For a variation on this recipe and a funny story about cooking rivalry, click here – La Cosa Nostra.

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Pasta Con Sarde

ingredients

Sarde 1

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Preparation:

Boil the fennel in 4 quarts of salted water for 10 minutes then drain, saving the water to cook the pasta, chop the fennel and set aside.

Fry onion in oil with salt, black and red pepper. Add anchovy to onions and dissolve. Cook onions at a low heat until soft but not brown. Add fennel to onions and mix thoroughly. Add pinoles and rehydrated raisins to sauce.  Keep heat low.

Dissolve saffron in ½ cup of warm water. Add some to pasta water and the rest to the sauce.

Cut the filets into four pieces, raise heat, add to the sauce and cook for a few minutes.

For the pasta:   Cook the buccatelli in the water that you used to boil the fennel. Add the cooked pasta and 1/2 cup of the pasta water to the sauce and toss gently so you don’t break the fillets.  

Place pasta in a large serving bowl and top with some of the toasted bread crumbs (click here for recipe).  No cheese on this pasta!

Pass the crumbs and extra sauce.

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SUNDAY GRAVY

6SUNDAY GRAVY

Happy Sunday – This is about the Sunday gravy I grew up with. It’s tomato sauce with meat but really much more. My mother started it in the morning and simmered it on a very low heat until the last of the family was home from the 12:30 Mass. My father and I went to the 9 o’clock mass and brought home something for breakfast – usually Danish, crullers and jelly donuts. After we ate, my father would grate enough parmigiana for the meal and my mother would begin by browning the various meats in lard – usually meat balls, sausage, short ribs and beef braciole. It would vary sometimes with ox tail or a pig skin braciole called cotechinata or in my family’s Napolitano dialect – gaudiga. It wasn’t my favorite. I always imagined I was eating a cooked football.

On her way to Mass as the gravy was simmering.
My mother, Connie, on her way to Mass as the gravy was simmering.

After talking to my sisters Nicki and Rochelle I came up with the following preparation for one pound of pasta:

Heat some olive oil (or lard if you don’t mind high cholesterol) and lightly brown whatever meat you’re using adding salt and black pepper. Do it in batches so it browns and doesn’t get crowded and steam. Remove the meat, add and lightly brown garlic (no onions) in the same pot. Return the meat and add one large can each, crushed tomatoes and tomato puree and stir.  Add two small cans (6 oz.) tomato paste.  Fill the two cans with water (you can use red wine instead although my mother never cooked with wine)to remove any paste remaining in cans, add to the sauce and stir until it’s smooth.  Add 3 or 4 basil stems with leaves, either fresh or preserved in oil, some red pepper flakes and simmer for as long as it takes for the toughest meat to be done.

For most people this is a big meal but we ate it between an elaborate ante pasta and a roast meat and vegetable course. Sunday dinner was served at 2 PM so at about 7 or 8 in the evening my mother would serve re-heated lunch leftovers.

A few words about tomatoes and pasta…

It’s more than acceptable to use canned tomatoes if they are San Marzano and there are no other ingredients (spices/flavorings) added to the can.

If you want to use fresh you have to peel and seed them. Put them in boiling water and wait until the outer thin skin cracks.  Run them under cold water and peel with your fingers. Cut it on the equator and take each half, squeeze and shake out the seeds.  Cut off the stem end and remove some of the core. Chop and you’re ready to cook.

For the pasta use more water than you’d think you’d need.  Add a lot of salt (it can only absorb so much). Some chefs say no oil in the water because it is absorbed by the pasta and prevents the sauce for adhering. Others say a few drops of oil helps prevent the pasta from sticking and adds a little flavor. I’ll leave it up to you. Cook until it’s done the way you like it and don’t worry about the Al Dente Police raiding your kitchen.

Ravioli – My mother, aunts and grandmother never used anything but a ricotta mix for stuffing.  Since we never ate in Italian restaurants I didn’t know they could be made with meat or anything else (pumpkin?) until I was almost an adult.  My family’s ravioli were square, large, sealed by crimping with a dinner fork, then laid out on a clean sheet on the bed to dry before cooking. If you’re in New York you can get good ones at Piemonte on Grand near Mulberry Streets or http://www.pastosa.com/.

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Store bought ravioli