Quarantine Garden

An interesting article about seeds from Gastro Obscura – 

Quarantine GardenStrawberry Spinach

These 7 Companies Ship Unique Seeds for Your Quarantine Garden

BY REINA GATTUSO

“In 1944, at the height of World War II, 20 million home gardeners across the United States dug deep to support the war effort. As the country poured the bulk of its resources into the conflict, Americans grew Victory Gardens to bolster the domestic food supply. . .”Quarantine GardenBitter Gourd


See the whole article here.Quarantine Garden

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Pasta Fazoole

Pasta Fazool

Pasta Fazool

In Italian its pasta e fagioli – that means “pasta and beans.” Some people call it pasta fazool. Both pronunciations are correct. In the Neapolitan dialect its pasta e fasule, often spelled pasta fazool in America.
Pasta Fazool
Ingredients:
  • Olive oil
  • 1 cup trinity
  • 1 lb. beans (whatever kind you like)
  • Salt and black pepper
  • Sm. can cherry tomatoes – optional
  • 1 lb. small pasta
  • 1 cup arugula or spinach – optional
Pasta Fazool
Pick through and rinse the beans.
Pasta Fazool
In a large pot, cook the trinity in oil. When the vegetables are soft, add the beans and 8 cups of water. Bring to a boil, lower heat and simmer, covered for 2 hours.
Pasta Fazool
Add salt and pepper, the cherry tomatoes, 2 more cups of water, and the pasta. If necessary, add more water as the pasta cooks. When the pasta is almost done, throw in a couple of hands full of arugula or spinach. I’m using a mix of both.  When the greens whilt, it’s ready to serve.
I think it’s tastier reheated the next day. Just add some water to the pot and stir over a low flame.
A pound of beans and a pound of pasta can rally grow as they cook. You might to cut those 2 ingredients in half.

Pasta Fazool

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Chianti Classico

Chianti Classico 
The black rooster is the symbol for Chianti Classico wine and it comes from the story of how the land between Siena and Tuscany came to be divided in the Middle Ages

The Birth of a Wine: The History of Chianti Classico 

by  ANGELA NARDIELLO

“. . . Tuscany.  If you’ve never been, I can guarantee you’ll be in awe of the beauty of its rolling vineyard filled hills, Cypress lined driveways and the golden glow that covers that land as the sun sets.  They say it is one of the most beautiful places in Italy, so its no wonder that the world’s rich and famous have been BUYING up all of Tuscany for the last century…or more!

Although many of the most beautiful areas and ancient Villas have been bought up by rich foreigners much of ‘Chiantishire’ or simply Chianti, is still owned by the original families as is the case with the Villa Barberino that still belongs to the Conti Family. . . “


Read the whole article here.Chianti Classico 


Chianti Classico 

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Pasta con Broccoli

Pasta con Broccoli

Here’s a simple dish. It’s easy to make with just a few easy to get ingredients.

Pasta con Broccoli

Ingredients:
  • broccoli cut into florets
  • ¼  cup olive oil
  • 2 cloves sliced garlic
  • 1 lb. pasta (your choice)
  • Salt and black pepper

Pasta con Broccoli

Place the broccoli in a pot of boiling salted water for 5 to 8 minutes.
Remove the broccoli to a bowl and with the water continuing to boil, add the pasta.Pasta con Broccoli
While the pasta is cooking, in another pot lightly sauté the garlic in the oil and then toss the broccoli, thoroughly coating it with the oil. Season with the salt and pepper.Pasta con Broccoli
When the pasta is almost done remove it from the water and add it to the broccoli, garlic, oil mix to finish cooking. Add some of the pasta water and a sprinkle of oil, stir and serve with grated Parmesan cheese if you like. This recipe also works with cauliflower instead of broccoli.

Pasta con Broccoli

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Pabst Blue Ribbon

Pabst Blue RibbonA great article on how a beer company survived Prohibition.

When the Government Banned PBR, Pabst Made Cheese Instead

By Mark Hay

“ . . . Yet as America moved towards Prohibition, the folks at Pabst recognized that their beer empire was about to dry up. So, soon after the nationwide ban on alcohol went into effect in 1920, Pabst pivoted to making a “delicious cheese food.” They called it Pabst-ett and sold it in block and spreadable forms, as well as in cheddar, pimento, and Swiss flavors . . . ”


Read the complete article here.


Pabst Blue Ribbon

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Sausage Cooked in Red Wine

Sausage Cooked in Red Wine

Here’s another simple but excellent recipe and it only has 2 ingredients. I got it from Giovanna Bellia LaMarca in her Sicilian cooking class at the Institute Culinary Education.
Sausage Cooked in Red Wine
Ingredients:
  • 1 lb. Italian sausage, hot or sweet
  • ¾ cup dry red wine (something good enough to drink)
Place the sausage in a single layer in a pan. Add enough water to reach ½ way up the sausage and cook, turning half way, until the water is almost evaporated.
Sausage Cooked in Red Wine
Add the wine and cook on medium-high heat, turning at least once, until the sausage is cooked on all sides. Serve the sausage with the pan drippings poured over them.Sausage Cooked in Red Wine

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Seven O’clock Thank You

My posts have been a little irregular for the last two weeks. It had nothing to do with the corona virus. Two weeks ago I spilled a glass of wine on my keyboard. You should try  to never do that. It killed my laptop. The was nowhere to quickly get it  fixed or buy a new one.  Bridget had an old one which I’m now using and although it took a while to gather all of the programs I needed to produce them, Reveries and Recipes blog posts are back. (Although I’m still having trouble with the new post notification email.)

Every night at 7 pm New York opens its windows and with 2 minutes of applause and cheers, thanks the medical and other essential  workers.

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Forks

FORKS

Caterina De Medici introduced the fork to the French in the 1500s when she became queen of France.

There are all kinds of forks . . .

FORKS

tuning forks,


FORKS

bicycle forks,


FORKS

garden forks,


FORKS

bar forks,


FORKS

pitch forks,


FORKS

 and forks in the road.


. . . but since this is a food blog, here’s what I’m talking about.

FORKS

This is from an interesting article in Italo-Americano about forks .

Italian Inventions: The Utilitarian Table Fork

by MARIELLA RADAELLI 

“In most western households, forks are a basic part of a table setting — unless you’re all eating is soup. The relationship Italians have with the fork is certainly crucial. How could we eat spaghetti without one? When I was a kid, my dad spent hours teaching me how to twirl my fork so that not a strand of spaghetti hung down as I lifted that incredible tool to my mouth. He also taught me you don’t use a fork and a spoon to eat pasta. Twirling spaghetti against a spoon is for children and at a certain point I had to grow up . . . “

Complete article here.

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